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For more information, please contact:

Marty Haught — Communications
Phone: (817) 782-8393
E-mail: martyh@united-cs.com

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information Please contact

John Davis – Communications Director

Phone: (817) 782-8354

E-mail: johnd@united-cs.com

Feb. 27, 2018

United Cooperative Services Completes Restoration Feb. 26

Fellow co-ops lend major support in biggest restoration in cooperative’s history.


STEPHENVILLE – As of 8 p.m. Monday (Feb. 26), United Cooperative Services and crews from 11 other electric cooperatives and contractors restored service to the last remaining member who lost power as a result of the Feb. 21 ice storm, the worst storm-related outage event in the cooperative’s history. Banding together, more than 100 personnel worked 16 to 20-hour shifts to get the power restored.

“I couldn’t be prouder of this group of folks for responding the way they did to restore power to our membership,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “More so, I’m most proud that all of these linemen, most of whom have never worked with or alongside each other, completed this restoration safely and without an accident. They did great work and they get to go home to their families because they did great work safely.”

When the Arctic weather front dipped further south and westerly than predicted, it left more than 8,000 United members residing in Erath, Palo Pinto and Hood counties without power.  Ice accumulations of 1-2 inches thick snapped power lines designed to carry electrical current not hundreds of extra pounds of ice. In many cases the lines sagged as low as 10 feet, often tangling in trees at that level, or simply snapped and wound around thick brush below. Tree trimming crews cut paths through much of the dense brush and trees just so linemen could access lines, untangle them and carry them up the poles they had to climb.

The freezing weather and steady precipitation didn’t break until midday on Feb. 24, and the combination of the two elements had mired early progress as crews slogged their way through dense thickets and yards of mud to walk out, clear and repair damaged line. Equipment got stuck repeatedly, so fatigued crews carried equipment with them from pole to pole, and from one damaged span of line to the next, in the rain and in the cold. It took the crews about five days to complete the restoration of infrastructure damaged by one day’s worth of freezing drizzle, along with 48 hours of unrelenting rainfall that left terrain saturated and nearly inaccessible to heavy equipment.

The immense restoration effort, aided by the crews and equipment volunteered by 11 other electric cooperatives that included Bandera Electric Cooperative, Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, CoServ Electric, Hamilton Electric Cooperative, HILCO Electric Cooperative, Heart of Texas Electric Cooperative, Jasper-Newton Electric Cooperative, Lyntegar Electric Cooperative, San Bernard Electric Cooperative, South Plains Electric Cooperative and Tri-County Electric Cooperative (Okla.), was made in response to what will now rank among the most devastating weather-related outage/damage events recorded in United’s history.

Smallwood said recovery from the storm’s devastation would have taken much longer if the extra manpower and resources had not been available.

“If not for the help of our co-op friends, this restoration effort would have taken weeks rather than days,” he said. On behalf of our membership and cooperative, we can’t thank them enough for their willingness to help and the commitment their linemen have demonstrated throughout this event,” Smallwood said.

Once the restoration process began in earnest late Feb. 22 when temperatures rose above freezing and began to melt the ice, a systematic and organized strategy launched and crews started at each substation.

“They start work from the beginning of each substation feeder line and move outward because it’s the safest and most efficient way to handle an outage event of this magnitude,” said Smallwood. “The feeders are the primary infrastructure that carry the electricity to each electric ‘tap’ toward member homes/meters,” he added. “As crews repaired or replaced downed feeder lines, we energized those sections until we reached the end of the feeder. Other crews came behind the initial crews and addressed the ‘tap’ lines that serve the loads, which are our members’ homes.”

While this event proved challenging and caused a great deal of frustration among the membership affected by it, there was also a silver lining. Many United members donated drinks and goodies to the line crews throughout the restoration, not only providing nourishment to the body, but also lifting the morale of the fatigued linemen.

“Disaster often brings people and communities closer together,” Smallwood said. “United is a cooperative, which is a business model that succeeds because people, such as our members, first responders, general public, employees and our board of directors, work together for a greater good. All of us came together in this event and the greater good was a successful restoration that would have taken much longer had we not all cooperated.”

United continues to emphasize members to stay away from any downed power lines or electrical infrastructure. Assume it is energized and call United to report downed lines as soon as possible.

 

About United Cooperative Services:          

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 80,000 meters and 55,000 members. United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves. Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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Feb. 25, 2018

United Cooperative Services Crews Restore 3,000 Since Saturday Morning

Crews work around the clock in worst storm-related outage event in co-op’s history.


STEPHENVILLE – Since 6 a.m. Feb. 24, 2018, United Cooperative Services, along with more than a hundred operations and tree-trimming personnel from other electric cooperatives and contractors, have restored electric service to more than 3,000 members in what is the worst storm-related event outage in the electric cooperative’s history.

Demonstrating Cooperative Principle No. 6—Cooperation Among Cooperatives—11 fellow electric cooperatives sent an elite contingent of linemen to help rebuild and repair the United infrastructure crippled by the ice storm on Feb. 21.

“On behalf of our membership and cooperative, we can’t thank our co-op friends enough for their willingness to help and the commitment their linemen have demonstrated throughout this event,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “If not for Bandera Electric Cooperative, Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, CoServ Electric, Hamilton Electric Cooperative, HILCO Electric Cooperative, Heart of Texas Electric Cooperative, Jasper-Newton Electric Cooperative, Lyntegar Electric Cooperative, San Bernard Electric Cooperative, South Plains Electric Cooperative, Tri-County Electric Cooperative (Okla.), this restoration effort would be weeks-long rather than days long.”

The process of restoration has been extremely systematic and organized, which is the strategy that’s been executed from the beginning of the ice storm. The crews started at each substation. They start work from the beginning of each substation feeder line and move outward because it’s the safest and most efficient way. These are the primary “arteries” that carry the electricity to each electric “tap” toward member homes/meters. Once the crews restore these primary lines, the outage management system notes that area as restored.

“If you see on our Outage Viewer on our website at www.united-cs.com that your area is restored, but you still don’t have power, please text the outage in, which automatically re-enters your specific outage into our Outage Management System and verifies that you have an outage,” Smallwood said. “If you can’t text, call one of our offices,” he added. “To text your outage, text the word ‘OUT’ to 85700.”

The remaining outages are still mostly scattered throughout Erath County. Crews will continue to work around the clock, making repairs or replacing destroyed equipment. The progress was steady in spite of the conditions, but there is a significant amount of power lines on the ground that need to be either replaced or restrung.

Smallwood continues to emphasize members to stay away from any downed power lines or electrical infrastructure. Assume it is energized and call United to report downed lines as soon as possible.

 

About United Cooperative Services:          

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 80,000 meters and 55,000 members. United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves. Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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Feb. 23, 2018

United Cooperative Services Crews Restore 1,600 Friday

More electric cooperatives join restoration effort of historic storm damage.


STEPHENVILLE – United Cooperative Services, along with more than 100 operations and tree-trimming personnel from other electric cooperatives and contractors, toiled through lines tangled in trees and swamp-like saturated ground to restore more than 1,600 members as of 6:30 p.m.

Joining United and crews from HILCO Electric Cooperative and Heart of Texas Electric Cooperative today were fellow cooperatives Bandera Electric Cooperative, Bluebonnet Electric Cooperative, Lyntegar Electric Cooperative, San Bernard Electric Cooperative, Jasper-Newton Electric Cooperative and Hamilton County Electric Cooperative. Joining the restoration effort Saturday will be crews from South Plains Electric Cooperative.

“As an electric cooperative, we abide by seven Cooperative Principles,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “Principle No. 6 is Cooperation Among Cooperatives, and that is never more exemplified than when you’re in need. Our crews have had to answer the call to help other electric cooperatives suffering through similar circumstances in the past, and now the co-op cavalry has answered the call from us. Like United’s employees, everything these crews focus on is to provide members, whether they are theirs or another co-op’s, the best possible service.”

Crews will continue to work around the clock making repairs and replacing destroyed equipment. Friday’s progress was steady in spite of the conditions, but linemen discovered a significant amount of power lines on the ground that need to be either replaced or restrung.

Smallwood continues to emphasize that the public should stay away from any downed power lines or electrical infrastructure. Assume it is energized, and call United to report downed lines as soon as possible.

Members can monitor outages from United’s outage dashboard at http://outage.united-cs.com:7576/. A hardhat icon indicates a crew is working to restore power. This can be viewed on a web browser on a smart phone or tablet equipped with internet access.

During a loss of electricity, members of United Cooperative Services should have account numbers handy and call their area office and report the outage:

Cleburne 817-556-4000
Burleson 817-447-9292
Granbury 817-326-5232
Meridian 254-435-2832
Possum Kingdom 940-779-2985
Stephenville 254-965-3153

About United Cooperative Services:          

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 80,000 meters and 55,000 members. United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves. Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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Feb. 22, 2018

United Cooperative Services Reports Major Damage to Western Territory

Linemen facing one of the most challenging restoration efforts in cooperative’s history.


STEPHENVILLE – United Cooperative Services linemen have discovered massive destruction to electrical infrastructure in the wake of an ice storm that has wreaked havoc to the co-op’s western service territory.

Erath County has continued to be hardest hit, affecting members in the thousands throughout the ordeal. On top of assigning restoration to all available United crews and several contract crews, United officials also have accepted the assistance of crews from HILCO Electric Cooperative, Heart of Texas Electric Cooperative and Hamilton County Electric Cooperative.

“The ice has damaged and continues to damage poles, lines and other infrastructure,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “Again and again, linemen have repaired circuits and restored power only to have more tree limbs and ice-coated power lines break under the weight of the ice and damage the repairs. At the moment, we’re facing one of the most challenging restoration efforts in my 20 years at this cooperative and members should prepare to be without power for several days. With that said, we will not give up until everyone’s electrical service has been restored.”

United officials who have surveyed the damage found many poles in the area have been toppled, leaving miles of spans of line on the ground.  Also, they discovered ice more than two inches thick hanging on power lines and trees. To compound problems, the Stephenville area experienced yet another morning thunderstorm, dumping more water on an already saturated ground and making it more difficult to even impossible for linemen to access areas needing repair.

Smallwood emphasized members to stay away from any downed or low-hanging power lines or electrical infrastructure. Assume it is energized and call United to report downed lines as soon as possible.

Members can monitor outages from United’s outage dashboard at http://outage.united-cs.com:7576/. A hardhat icon indicates a crew is working to restore power. This can be viewed on a web browser on a smart phone or tablet equipped with internet access.

During a loss of electricity, members of United Cooperative Services should have account numbers handy and call their area office and report the outage:

Cleburne 817-556-4000
Burleson 817-447-9292
Granbury 817-326-5232
Meridian 254-435-2832
Possum Kingdom 940-779-2985

Stephenville 254-965-3153

 

About United Cooperative Services:          

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 80,000 meters and 55,000 members. United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves. Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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Feb. 21, 2018

United Cooperative Services Crews Battling to Restore Recent Outages

Recent storms, ice damaging infrastructure in western portions of service territory.


BURLESON – Relentless rain, sleet and icy conditions produced multiple outages throughout United Cooperative Services western service territory. As of Wednesday evening (Feb. 21), about 7,000 members were without power. Erath County was hardest hit with outages in excess of 5,500.

“We have dedicated every resource and body available to this restoration effort,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “We’ve sent our contract crews out into the field to assist, and crews from neighboring co-ops have committed to join the effort. With that said, the level of damage the ice and storms have done is extensive, and the precipitation has made getting to many problem areas impossible. This restoration effort could take one to two days for some members.”

In the storms, poles have been toppled, leaving many spans of line on the ground. United encourages everyone to stay away from any downed power lines and to call United to report downed lines as soon as possible.

Members can monitor outages from United’s outage dashboard at http://outage.united-cs.com:7576/. A hardhat icon indicates a crew is working to restore power. This can be viewed on a web browser on a smart phone or tablet equipped with internet access.

During a loss of electricity, members of United Cooperative Services should have account numbers handy and call their area office and report the outage:

Cleburne 817-556-4000
Burleson 817-447-9292
Granbury 817-326-5232
Meridian 254-435-2832
Possum Kingdom 940-779-2985

Stephenville 254-965-3153

 

About United Cooperative Services:          

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 80,000 meters and 55,000 members. United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves. Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Editor’s note: See graph below.

Jan. 2, 2018

United Warns Cold Weather Translates into Higher Electricity Usage, Bills

 

With the blasts of arctic air that have recently surged across North Texas, biting deep into consumers’ pocketbooks when heating systems are continuously ramped up to answer temperatures from the teens to the 30s, United Cooperative Services is encouraging members and the general public to be even more vigilant in determining ways to control their energy usage—holding onto precious energy dollars.

“When we encounter the weather we’ve seen recently, members ask if the cooperative raised rates,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “It’s not that rates have gone up. It’s that usage has surged as we transition from traditionally low-usage periods in October and November to the harsh, low temperatures from December through February. During these types of weather scenarios, we strongly encourage our members to reach out to us and take advantage of our free home energy audits and all of the resources and rebates United provides to help hold down energy costs.”

To demonstrate how weather affects usage, the electric cooperative looked at United employee and member Robert Bernhoft’s usage from Dec. 11-31, 2017. During this 20-day usage period, the temperatures see-sawed up from mild to below freezing. When temperatures were chilly on Dec. 31, and the high reached only about 30 degrees, the Bernhoft house used 234 kWh of electricity. Compare that day with Dec. 21, when the high temperature reached 78 degrees—and Bernhoft’s heating system didn’t need to cycle on as long or frequently—and his usage was a modest 59 kWh.

“Heating and cooling are responsible for the largest part of a typical electric bill, which makes sense because weather is the No. 1 driver of energy consumption,” Bernhoft said. “It should also be noted that I have R-38 attic and R-19 wall insulation, but when it gets as cold as it did at the end of December, your heating system will run.”

Regardless of whether someone is at home or away during the day, weather dictates energy consumption.

“Even when you lower your thermostat to 60 degrees as you walk out the door to work in the morning, if it’s 30, 40 or even 50 degrees outside, it’s going to affect the ambient air in your home and trigger the heater to turn on,” Bernhoft said.

Use the tips below to ensure your household is using energy wisely.

  • Ensure attic insulation levels are sufficient and add more, if necessary. United recommends an insulation value of R-38 (United provides rebates on some qualifying attic insulation upgrades).
  • Weatherize the home, including caulking around windows and sealing with weather-stripping around doors.
  • Ensure duct work is adequately sealed at joints and intersections with appropriate tape or mastic.
  • Avoid using electric space heaters, which are energy hogs and can substantially increase electric bills.
  • Ensure the fireplace flue is closed when not in use. An open flue sucks heat out of the home.
  • Utilize programmable thermostats to lower the home temperature when not at home and set it no higher than 68 degrees when occupying the home.
  • Water heaters should be set to 120 degrees and if the unit is in a garage or another unconditioned space, utilize an insulated water heater blanket (United members may obtain one during a free energy audit while supplies last).
  • Check and or change furnace filters monthly.
  • Close drapes at night.

 

“United is committed to helping its members waste less energy and control their energy costs,” Smallwood said. “During these frigid times, we encourage all of our members to be vigilant in managing their energy use to control their electric bills.”

 

About United Cooperative Services:       

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, Texas, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving 83,000 meters.  Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

 

CUTLINE: This graph shows how weather drives energy use. The red and blue lines are the day’s high and low temperatures.  Once the cold front blew through last weekend, Robert Bernhoft’s daily usage (as seen in the gold and blue usage bars) skyrocketed to 234 kWh on Dec. 31, when the high was only about 30 degrees. Compare that with the daily usage on Dec. 21, when the high was 78 degrees and his usage was a modest 59 kWh. While United can’t control the weather, our trusted energy experts can help members save energy and money.  Sign up for a free energy audit today at united-cs.com

 

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Oct. 24, 2017

 

Directors Dumas and Thompson Re-Elected to UCS Board

Dumas re-elected board president.

BURLESON—At the regular monthly meeting of United Cooperative Services’ Board of Directors, Patsy Dumas (District 2) Monday was re-elected president of the board. Dumas represents the cooperative’s membership in the Burleson-Mansfield area. Other board officers re-elected include Vice President Larry Bays (District 7) and Secretary/Treasurer Tommy Cantrell (District 3).

The board officer slate was cast following the cooperative’s annual board of director elections, the results of which were canvassed Oct. 21 at the cooperative’s 79th Annual Meeting of the membership at Glen Rose High School. United members re-elected Dumas and Harry Thompson (District 1, Possum Kingdom Lake area) to three-year terms respectively on United’s board of directors.

 “Our board has been instrumental in United’s success in providing safe, reliable and affordable electric distribution service to our membership,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “I look forward to Patsy Dumas’ leadership as board president, as well as the continued contributions by United’s entire board of directors, as we continue to work hard to provide our members exceptional service and value.”

 “I’m humbled by my fellow directors’ confidence in re-electing me to serve as president of the board of United Cooperative Services,” Dumas said. “Looking forward, I see opportunities and challenges. Some of them will be significant. Some of them will require vision. All of them will require us to work together as a cooperative to be innovative, agile and visionary. This doesn’t worry me because I know we have the management and employees with the skills and the will to succeed.”

 

About United Cooperative Services:                                                       

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, Texas, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 83,000 meters and over 57,000 members.  Maintaining more than 10,500 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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Sept. 7, 2017

 

United Cooperative Services Reaches 2 Million Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident

Co-op proves productivity and safety can coexist.

BURLESON - United Cooperative Services employees have reached an historic milestone—2 million work hours without a lost-time accident. While this achievement is immensely significant for the 152-employee electric cooperative utility, it is more noteworthy when considering the business it’s in—delivering electric power to the co-op’s 80,000-plus member-owners.

“This is by far the biggest and most important achievement I’ve been associated with in my 20-plus years in the electric utility industry,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “This accomplishment is a direct result of our employees constantly putting safety as the No. 1 priority at our cooperative, which has led to a total safety culture.”

Establishing an effective safety program, especially at an electric utility, requires commitment from the entire organization, starting at the top. As CEO of United, Smallwood challenges all of the employees to be the best at everything they do, but specifically to put safety first when performing their job duties—no matter what.

Keeping United’s infrastructure operating at an optimal reliability level, while keeping its rates affordable, often requires employees to encounter some of the harshest conditions when restoring power or simply performing day-to-day maintenance. Some of the challenges faced by employees include tornadoes, wild fires, raging winds, lightning and heavy downpours. Despite these hurdles, United employees perform their jobs professionally and, more importantly, safely.

“United is considered to be one of the most progressive, productive, efficient and successful electric cooperative utilities in the nation,” Smallwood said. “Our members have given us through our satisfaction surveys the highest satisfaction scores in the nation. That’s a tremendous honor that we strive to obtain every day. However, there is nothing we, as United Cooperative Services employees, could ever hope to accomplish at this cooperative that is worth injuring or, worse, killing an employee over,” he added. “At the end of each day when every single employee returns home safely is the true accomplishment of our safety culture.”

The byproducts of United’s safety culture can be seen in all areas of the co-op’s business. When people are injured on the job, it costs an organization a tremendous amount—financially, operationally and emotionally.

“In approaching their duties safely, the United employees clearly demonstrate the advantages of being an electric cooperative member. The people we serve get to see the results of our employees’ efforts every day through the safe, reliable and affordable electric service we provide,” Smallwood said.

While the 2 million hours without a lost-time accident serves as a symbol of achievement, the approach to safety taken by United employees is the reason why it occurred. That emphasis on safety will continue to serve as the hallmark of United Cooperative Services.

 About United Cooperative Services:

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, Texas, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 81,000 meters and nearly 60,000 members.  United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves.  Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

-oOo-

 

 


 

Aug. 16, 2017

 

 

United to Offer Members Solar Power With Community Plant

BURLESON – With the goal of making solar energy more accessible for its members, United Cooperative Services (United) today announced the commencement of a 9.9 MW (AC) community solar power plant that will immediately begin construction in Bosque County. The plant developer is TurningPoint Energy and will be built by DEPCOM Power Inc. (DEPCOM).

“Community solar allows multiple people to get electricity from a large solar photovoltaic array, offering a convenient, affordable option for our members who want a part of their monthly power to come from the environmentally friendly energy source,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “Our community solar project is an attractive option for members interested in solar, but who don’t wish to make a significant financial investment, or do not have optimal space or roof orientation, allowing for the maximum output of the solar system. Our community solar facility will also be the perfect solution for members who rent their homes, or do not want to own or maintain a solar array.”

This community solar plant required no upfront costs to United. However, energy produced by the facility will be sold under a power purchase agreement from DEPCOM to United. As an electric distribution cooperative serving 83,000 meters in 14 north Texas counties, United does not generate electricity, but delivers power to member homes and businesses over 11,000 miles of line. The solar power plant is scheduled to achieve commercial operation by the end of 2017 and will generate clean energy to help bring affordably priced solar power to thousands of United residential members. The facility will cover 58 of the 105-acre site.

“Having always been committed to bringing innovative energy solutions to our membership that align with our mission of delivering exceptional service and value, this community solar facility will give our members access to cost-effective and reliable solar power,” Smallwood said.

Key details for this community solar project include:

  • Facility capacity of 9.9 MW (AC)
  • 55 local jobs created with an emphasis on hiring military veterans
  • 553 rows of tracking solar panels to obtain optimal facility energy output
  • 44,340 solar panels with wattages of 320w and 325w per panel

Currently, United is developing the community solar program that will be offered to members and allow members to purchase energy from the system with an availability to occur in the first quarter of 2018.

About United Cooperative Services: 

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, Texas, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving 83,000 meters and more than 57,000 members.  United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves.  Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves all or parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

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For Immediate Release

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         June 5, 2017

UCS Offers $2,500 Reward for Information Leading to Arrest

Perpetrators shoot electric company’s equipment, causing outage and unnecessary expense.

Stephenville, TX – United Cooperative Services (United) announced today that it is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the perpetrator(s) who fired gunshots that caused extensive damage last week to its infrastructure on F.M. 219 and C.R. 420 in Huckabay.

“Our members, both residential and those with businesses served by our electric distribution facilities, depend on having electricity for sustenance of life and economy,” said United CEO Cameron Smallwood. “We are committed to taking aggressive action against anyone who wishes to destroy our equipment that prevents us from delivering safe, reliable and affordable service to our members."

United supports local law enforcement authorities investigating the crime, which caused a day-long outage to one member. With this reward, the cooperative hopes to bring the perpetrator(s) to justice.

The damaged equipment has a value of more than $60,000. However, and more importantly, damaging high-voltage equipment can cause serious injury or death to the perpetrators or innocent bystanders.

“We intend to prosecute to the fullest extent of the law and bring this evildoer or these evildoers to justice,” Smallwood said. “We have earmarked $2,500 to reward anyone who has information that would help us get these people off the streets. Anyone who knows anything about this crime, please contact the cooperative or local law enforcement."

About United Cooperative Services: 

Established in 1938 and headquartered in Cleburne, Texas, United Cooperative Services is an electric distribution cooperative serving more than 81,000 meters and nearly 60,000 members.  United plays a key role in the economic development of its communities and unlike a private utility, the cooperative is a not-for-profit business owned by the members it serves.  Maintaining more than 11,000 miles of energized line, United serves parts of Johnson, Erath, Hood, Bosque, Somervell, Palo Pinto, Coryell, Eastland, Comanche, Stephens, Young, Hamilton, Tarrant and Ellis counties.

-oOo-

 

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